Tag Archives: Russian_food

Crepe Cake with custard creme

¬†Yes-yes! It’s blini again! I was eating lots of crepes last two weeks, seems I need to stop. ūüėÄ But this is the¬†whole cake!¬†Believe¬†me, you need to try it once to be obsessed forever! ūüėČ Just few days back I was watching one video and Russian confectioner made sweet blini-cake, it was a sign to make it and of course to try new recipe of blini. It turned out to be easy to make, but get ready to prepare a lots of blini! Despite the fact that I used too wide pan and the stack wasn’t high as much as I wanted,¬†blini turned out thin, tender and very tasty.Blini Cake with custard cream

¬†I decided to make custard cream (the confectioner made another cream), which is not very sweet and buttery. The¬†quantity¬†of the cream was more than enough for my cake, so I spread it on each crepe and put the cake in the fridge to set. Impatiently, I sliced into the cake, bite it and was surprised, the crepes absorbed almost all the cream. There was only the one way out – to eat it with sweet condensed milk on side. ūüėÄ So, next time I will make double¬†quantity¬†of the cream.Crepe Cake

Crepe Cake with custard creme

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: easy
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Before assembling the cake, allow the crepes and cream to cool completely.
The crepe-cake tastes also good on the second day and can be a tasty breakfast, if you manage to save a slice that long!
Thin Blini (crepes)
300g flour- sift in a bowl
1 tsp/5g salt
500ml milk
5 eggs, beaten
120ml water
70g butter, melted
Custard cream 
500ml milk, full fat
4 egg yolks
100g fine sugar
40g cornmeal
1 vanilla bean or 1 tsp extract
In a small bowl whisk together sugar and yolks until the mixture is pale. Add cornmeal while continuing to gently whisk the mixture.
In a pan bring milk with vanilla bean to a boil while constantly stirring and taking care not to burn it.
Gradually pour half of the hot milk into the egg mixture  while continuing to stir. Pour egg mixture into the pan with the other half of milk, continuously stir. Continue cooking and stirring to the point of the mixture becoming thick and custard forming Рabout 10 minutes.
Cool the custard completely.
Enjoy!

Golubtsi – Russian stuffed cabbage rolls

Stuffed cabbage rolls is a very popular dish in many countries over the world. In Russia, it’s called ‘golubtsi’ – white¬†cabbage¬†leaves stuffed with¬†saut√©ed¬†ground pork or beef and rice or buckwheat.
¬†Originally, cabbage leaves were stuffed with meat mixed with millet porridge and the dish was named ‘galushi’. But in 18-19th centuries France had a great influence on Russian cuisine, at least for the upper classes. Many French chefs streamed to Russian to work for royal courts, nobility and other wealthy¬†families.¬†Russian Golubtsi
¬†French cooking was so prevalent among the upper classes that there were not enough French-born chefs to fill the demand.¬†Wealthy¬†Russians began to send their serfs to work under French chefs in Moscow and Sr.Petersburg, and a few were even sent to¬†France¬†for their¬†training. Some of these peasants were allowed to work in the city, provided they remitted to their masters the required obrok or quit-rent, which was a payment in kind or in money. Others were sold after they had completed their training. Count Rostov in Tolstoy’s War and Peace, for instance, spoke with satisfaction of paying a¬†thousand¬†rubles for Taras, a serf who prepared savory hazel grouse¬†saut√©ed¬†in Madeira for his daughter Natasha’s name day dinner.*¬†
¬†Thus, Russians were hooked on French dishes, and among which was popular a whole grilled pigeon, covered with a cabbage leave. The dish became fancy and well-liked, and soon was called simply ‘golubi’ or¬†‘golubtsi’¬†– from¬†Russian word ‘golub’ that literally means pigeon. Lately cooks began to prepare a fake ‘pigeon’ – well-known stuffed cabbage rolls, which were cheaper and affordable for the lower classes.
Golubtsi - Russian stuffed cabbage rolls
Also, big thanks to Angie for featuring my post – red pancakes! I’m bringing these cabbage rolls to the super Fiesta Friday party! I know, it’s such a simple dish, that many of you have¬†tried it already, but I hope you are tired of sweets and enjoy Russian comforting food. ūüôā

Golubtsi - Russian stuffed cabbage rolls

  • Servings: 10-12 rolls
  • Difficulty: moderate
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Ingredients
1 white cabbage
500g beef mince (or mix pork+beef)
90-100g uncooked white rice, short-grain
1/2 large onion, finely chopped
1/2 carrot, shredded
1/2 tsp dried marjoram, optional
S&P to taste
Sauce
1/2 large onion, chopped
1/2 carrot,  shredded
2-3 tbsp tomato paste
oil, for frying
200-300ml water*
2 bay leaves
5-6 black peppercorns
S&P to taste
Garnish
sour cream, chopped parsley, optional
  • Sauce. In a large pan over medium heat, heat the oil. Add onion and carrot for the sauce, cook for 5-6 minutes or until soft. Stir in tomato paste. Turn off the heat and set aside.
  • Cabbage. Discard the 2 or 3 outer leaves of the cabbage. Carefully pull off leaves one by one. Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Immerse cabbage leaves and cook for 3-4 minutes. Using tongs, take the leaves out and transfer to a bowl. *Reserve the water to use it lately for the sauce.
  • Filling. Cook the rice fro 8-10 minutes in bowling water. In a large bowl, mix together the beef, rice, onion, carrot and spices. You can fry onion before adding it to the¬†filling.
  • Working with one cabbage leaf at a time, slice off the thick outer rib near the stem end. Place the leaf, rounded up like a bowl, stem end¬†closest¬†to you. Spoon about 2 tbsp of the meat mixture, form it into a short log shape. ¬†Don’t make the rolls too tight. Transfer the roll, seams down, to the pan with sauce. Shape the remaining rolls in the same way.
  • Pour in water – just to cover the cabbage rolls,¬†add more if needed. Season to taste, add bay leaves and peppercorns. On a medium-high heat bring it to boil. Then reduce heat to lower, cover the pan with a lid (or you can use a piece of foil) and cook for 40 minutes. You may cut one roll to test it.
  • Serve rolls with their cooking sauce, sprinkled with parsley and garnish with sour cream, if desired.

Golubtsi

Maslenitsa (Butter Week). Blini recipe.

¬†Maslenitsa (Butter Week) is a Christian holiday, one of the brightest and widely-celebrated holiday in Russia, a week before Great Lent. The name Maslenitsa came from Russian word ‘maslo’ which means butter. In the beginning of 16th century, when Church initiated¬†the holiday, it was¬†restricted¬†to eat meat, however fish was allowed, as well as dairy products and butter. Most of the¬†peasants¬†could afford to eat only butter, thus the week began to call Butter Week or Maslenitsa.
¬†During¬†Druids’ times- before 16th century in Rus’ (old Russia’s name) was celebrated¬†a pagan holiday –¬†The Day of spring equinox, which was called Komoedica. It was one of the ancient pagan holidays, celebration of greeting spring, and moreover, worship of the Slavic Bear God: early in the morning people got together, song the songs and went into the forest¬†to praise the Bear God, so they left¬†first and freshly-cooked¬†blini on tree stumps to treat him. After that the Butter Week revelry had been started.Russian stuffed blini (crepes)
 That time Spring was considered as a beginning of new life, people revered to the Sun and made round flat-bread as its symbol. But  in 9th century peasants began to make round-shaped blini. Hot and yellowish, blini became new symbol of the Sun; people also believed that with eating blini they had a piece of warmth and power of the Sun.
¬†In¬†ancient¬†times the Komoeditsa holiday was celebrated during two weeks and played an important role for peasants. After a long, cold and often starving winter people had to eat plenty of food (usually it was winter stock remains), cheered up and got stronger for future spring works. Butter week celebrations denoted that winter has passed, and it’s time for a warm season to come. After this holiday peasants began to work¬†from sunrise¬†until¬†sunset¬†during all warm months – spring, summer and¬†autumn. Up to next snow season, they forced to work¬†almost non-stop, without any¬†weekends to get food for their families, fodder for cattle; they repair houses, and cut woods to keep homes warm during the long Russian winter.Russian Blini
¬†When Christianity was established as a state¬†religion, all pagan celebrations and traditions were prohibited; Christian churchmen battle in a vain¬†attempt¬†to stop all holiday habits. After several centuries of¬†unsuccessful¬†fights, in 16th¬†century¬†the Church created new holiday – ‘meatless week’, the week before the Great Lent. People got used to the new holiday, started celebrate it widely and created other name – Maslenitsa.
 Finally traditional Maslenitsa celebrations were set in 18th century by Russian Emperor Petr I, who was a famous reveller and  party lover. Of course, the main treat was blini, which were baked and eaten in enormous amounts!
¬†One of my fav sweet fillings for blini is a mixture of tvorog (cottage cheese), sour cream, raisins and sugar. For me, it’s a pure indulgence to tuck the¬†delicious¬†filling into piping hot blini! You can also fold blini into half then half again to form wedge, then take the wedge and deep it onto sweet condensed milk.. Incredibly satisfying breakfast or lunch, or even dinner! ūüėÄ
 This blini recipe suits for any savory filling as well.

Russian blini. Sweet cottage cheese filling.

Ingredients 
2 eggs, medium size
a good pinch of salt
1-2 tbsp white sugar, optional
200ml hot water
1/2 tsp soda
200-230ml kefir (or sour milk/laban/buttermilk), 2-3% fat
150-170g plain flour
3-4 tbsp sunflower oil
some oil for frying, if needed
Filling
300-400g soft cottage cheese
2-3 tbsp sour cream, or more if needed
2-3 tbsp sugar or sweet condensed milk
50-60g sultana/raisins
Garnish
sour cream/sweet condensed milk/icing sugar
  • In a large mixing bowl, beat eggs with salt and sugar.
  • In a glass or cup mix water with soda, stir and add to the eggs, stirring constantly.
  • Add kefir and mix well.
  • Sift flour and add it to the batter. Stir to combine.
  • Add oil and stir.
  • Let the batter rest for 20-30 minutes, if you have time.
  • Heat the frying pan and fry thin pancakes as usual. You can make any¬†diameter¬†you like.
  • For the filling, soak sultanas in hot water for 5-10 minutes, then drain. Mix all ingredients until well combined.
  • To assemble, spoon some filling in¬†center¬†of each pancake. Fold bottom edge of pancake over fililng, fold in both sides and roll up. Sprinkle with icing sugar and/or drizzle some sweet condensed milk, if desired. Or serve with a dollop of sour cream.

Enjoy!